virtual grind thoughts from the virtual world

29Jul/140

vCloud Director Does Not Show Storage Policies

I have been experiencing this a lot lately with vCloud Director versions 5.x. What happens is that you will add tags in the web client and then apply to them to the appropriate datastores. After performing a "Refresh Storage Policies" in vCloud Director, your newly created polices do not show up.

I have found that this is a bug and does not clear unless you empty some tables in your vCloud Director database. The script below simply empties some inventory tables and when the services are restarted, re-syncs them from vCenter.

I will say that I always gracefully stop all cells, backup my vCloud database, then run this script. Please note that this script is not intrusive to any static data.

Script:

delete from task;
update jobs set status = 3 where status = 1;
update last_jobs set status = 3 where status = 1;
delete from busy_object;
delete from QRTZ_SCHEDULER_STATE;
delete from QRTZ_FIRED_TRIGGERS;
delete from QRTZ_PAUSED_TRIGGER_GRPS;
delete from QRTZ_CALENDARS;
delete from QRTZ_TRIGGER_LISTENERS;
delete from QRTZ_BLOB_TRIGGERS;
delete from QRTZ_CRON_TRIGGERS;
delete from QRTZ_SIMPLE_TRIGGERS;
delete from QRTZ_TRIGGERS;
delete from QRTZ_JOB_LISTENERS;
delete from QRTZ_JOB_DETAILS;
delete from compute_resource_inv;
delete from custom_field_manager_inv;
delete from cluster_compute_resource_inv;
delete from datacenter_inv;
delete from datacenter_network_inv;
delete from datastore_inv;
delete from dv_portgroup_inv;
delete from dv_switch_inv;
delete from folder_inv;
delete from managed_server_inv;
delete from managed_server_datastore_inv;
delete from managed_server_network_inv;
delete from network_inv;
delete from resource_pool_inv;
delete from storage_pod_inv;
delete from task_inv;
delete from vm_inv;
delete from property_map;

14Nov/130

Openstack Hands-On Labs Now Available

It is great to see the contributions from VMware around the Openstack platform, especially with the new Havana release.

VMware also released new hands-on labs around Openstack and vSphere (HOL-SDC-1320):

VMware Blog Posting

19Feb/120

Manually Remove vCloud Director Agent From Hosts

I recently ran in to an issue in a lab where I had to manually remove the vCD agent from an ESXi host. The command to manually do this on an ESXi5 host is:

esxcli software vib remove -n vcloud-agent

Note that this is vCloud Director 1.5.

31Mar/110

VMware vCloud Partners

VMware has recently posted a new site for vCloud Partners. This site contains a lot of information on vCloud Certified partners that provide services around vCD, as well as other features.

Check it out here.

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28Mar/110

Link To vSphere 4.0 iSCSI SAN Configuration Guide

When working with iSCSI arrays, this guide is worth gold.

Get the guide here.

28Mar/110

Enabling ARP Redirect For Compellent Arrays

In order for controller failover to work correctly when using ESX and Compellent arrays, you must enable arp redirect on your ESX hosts. If, for instance, you have a vmhba numbered vhmba33, you can check to see if arp redirect is enabled by connecting to the console and typing:

esxcfg-hwiscsi -l vmhba33

If arp redirect is not enabled, you can simply enable it with the following command:

esxcfg-hwiscsi -a allow vmhba33

13Nov/102

Automating VMware Tools Installation in Ubuntu

I have been asked numerous times about automating the VMware tools installation in Linux based operating systems.  I have seen people commonly use RPM's and even compile the tools from source, but the feedback I usually get is that admins would like to automate the installation, like they do in Windows.

Fortunately for us, VMware has been gracious enough to include packages for not only Ubuntu; but also Redhat, CentOS, and SLES.  When I tell people this, the response I usually get is that they never knew these options were available.

For the purpose of this post, I will go over the installation of VMware Tools in Ubuntu 10.04 LTS.  I will also include a link to VMware's official installation guide that covers these steps in detail for more operating systems.

The first step is to add VMware's repo to /etc/apt/sources.list and install VMware's GPG key.  Note that when you are adding the repo, you are adding the "4.1latest" repo.

$ apt-add-repository 'deb http://packages.vmware.com/tools/esx/4.1latest/ubuntu lucid main restricted'
$ wget http://packages.vmware.com/tools/VMWARE-PACKAGING-GPG-KEY.pub -q -O- | apt-key add -

The following five commands update your local package lists, installs VMware packages, and builds/installs the kernel modules:

$ apt-get update
$ apt-get install vmware-open-vm-tools-kmod-source
$ module-assistant prepare
$ module-assistant build vmware-open-vm-tools-kmod-source
$ module-assistant install vmware-open-vm-tools-kmod

Finally, now that everything is built, you simply need to install the packages. The final two commands depend on your installation. If you are not running a graphical interface on your system you will choose the first option that ends in "-nox". If you are using a graphical interface, use the latter command. Remember you only use on or the other, not both.

$ apt-get install vmware-open-vm-tools-nox 

OR
$ apt-get install vmware-open-vm-tools

The official VMware guide can be found here.